American mountain ash: A rosaceae by any other name

American mountain ash: A rosaceae by any other name

By LAURIE D. MORRISSEY There’s a giant living in northern Coös County, N.H. It’s a 61-foot tall tree, the country’s largest known American mountain ash. At last measurement, it stood at a height of 61 feet and had a circumference of 70 inches. That’s outstanding for a tree that’s described by most sources, including my… Read More »

Southern pine beetles march north

Southern pine beetles march north

By JOE RANKIN As if the emerald ash borer’s incursion into northern New England wasn’t enough, now there’s another potentially devastating forest pest marching this way: the southern pine beetle. Dendroctonus frontalis – the first name means “tree murderer,” we should note – is only a fraction of an inch long. But during outbreaks, they… Read More »

Tiny saw-whet owls are on the move

Tiny saw-whet owls are on the move

By BRETT AMY THELEN Every autumn, when the air tastes of apples and leaves crunch underfoot, my thoughts turn to tiny owls – northern saw-whet owls (Aegolius acadicus), to be exact. Just eight inches in length with a round head and bright yellow eyes, the saw-whet is arguably New England’s most endearing owl. Deer mice,… Read More »

Boxelders’ namesake bugs like to spend winter indoors

Boxelders’ namesake bugs like to spend winter indoors

By JOE RANKIN Comedian Rodney Dangerfield’s shtick was the phrase “I don’t get no respect,” always followed by one of his great self-deprecatory one-liners. If Rodney Dangerfield were a tree, he might be Acer negundo – the Boxelder, which also gets no respect. When Boxelder isn’t being ignored, it’s being disparaged, dismissed, or damned with… Read More »

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