Early summer nights great for luna moth watching

Early summer nights great for luna moth watching

SUSAN SHEA On early summer nights I sometimes see large, pale green moths with long, twisted tails fluttering near our porch light. Later, I often find them dead on the ground. These beautiful moths are luna moths, named for the Roman goddess of the moon. Each of their four wings has a transparent, moon-shaped eyespot.… Read More »

Lovely lupines: Not native to New England

Lovely lupines: Not native to New England

LAURIE D. MORRISSEY Lupine is one of the most spectacular flowers of early summer, painting long stretches of roadside with shades of purple and blue. Thanks to this tall, showy plant, even a stop-and-go drive to Boston’s Logan Airport has its moments of beauty (as I recently had occasion to observe). Full sun and dry,… Read More »

The humble hornpout: a bottom-feeding delicacy

The humble hornpout: a bottom-feeding delicacy

JOE RANKIN Consider, for a second, a fish that can live in turbid, low-oxygen water. It can breathe through its skin, eats almost any-thing, has a wickedly effective defense mechanism and is a really focused parent. Plus, it’s good to eat. We’re talking about the humble hornpout, or “horned pout,” if you prefer. Or “mud… Read More »

Fish scales and the American shad

Fish scales and the American shad

TIM TRAVER It’s tempting to simply view fish scales as armor, but there’s more to them than that. They provide camouflage; they also play a role in locomotion. For scientists working on the recovery of American shad in the Connecticut River, scales provide a record of a fish’s life history and a way to measure… Read More »

A Tale of Two Seasons

A Tale of Two Seasons

DAVE MANCE III The 2019 maple sugaring season has, for most, just ended in southern Vermont and New Hampshire, and so sugarmakers are tallying up their sap and syrup volumes to see how they made out. My sense, as a sugarmaker myself, is that most did well. In tallying our own numbers, it was interesting… Read More »

Northeastern wolves: The past, present and future

Northeastern wolves: The past, present and future

SUSAN SHEA On a moonlit night 200 years ago, a dog-shaped shadow slipped through the Vermont woods. The large, shaggy canid emerged onto a hilltop pasture, raised its muzzle, and howled – a deep, throaty howl that reverberated through the hills. A chorus of wolves responded. Wolves were common in the Northeast and most of… Read More »

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